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Unread 04-16-2015, 05:25 PM   #41
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Default Re: Old batteries with desulfator

I don't have personal experience with using these things, but I've been doing a lot of pre-purchase research and find it's easier for me to think of them in automotive terms.

cart charger--the service station gas pump up to the point where it shuts off on it's own.
maintainer/trickle charger--topping off the tank by hand and replacing cap to stop evaporation loss (battery self discharge)
desulfator--adding fuel stabilizer and injector cleaner

If you have the time, a 2amp maintainer might charge your pack but it would be like filling the truck gas tank one cup at a time.


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Unread 04-17-2015, 07:07 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDLNB View Post
This is proving what someone else said on here, that the maintainer charges the pack higher than the regular charger.

It only appears that it charges the pack higher because it's always providing a small current to "keep" the pack fully charged. Remember you have to provide a higher current than the pack outputs itself in order to charge and maintain.

Your main charger is shutting off after it's done during the night and pack voltage is dropping a little due to "resting" by the time you hop on and go. ....If you turned off your maintainer and left over night the voltage of the pack would also drop.

Now... over time you will get a higher pack voltage after a charge from desulfating the batteries, maybe that is what they were referring too?
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Unread 04-17-2015, 08:11 AM   #43
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Default Re: Old batteries with desulfator

Quote:
Originally Posted by UncleJerm76 View Post
It only appears that it charges the pack higher because it's always providing a small current to "keep" the pack fully charged. Remember you have to provide a higher current than the pack outputs itself in order to charge and maintain.

Your main charger is shutting off after it's done during the night and pack voltage is dropping a little due to "resting" by the time you hop on and go. ....If you turned off your maintainer and left over night the voltage of the pack would also drop.

Now... over time you will get a higher pack voltage after a charge from desulfating the batteries, maybe that is what they were referring too?
Good point. Sounds logical.
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Unread 04-18-2015, 01:43 PM   #44
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Default Re: Old batteries with desulfator

Ok, so Thursday I drove my golf cart a little over five miles round trip, to get a haircut. Instead of hooking up the golf cart charger, I decided to see how long it would take for the Save-a-Battery charger/maintainer to bring it back up to a full charge. I had a full charge when I left. It took a little over 24 hours for it to go from blinking-charge yellow led to steady-maintainer yellow led. It did get warm while it was charging, but not hot. And while maintaining, it does not get warm at all. Just thought I would pass that on to anyone interested in the maintainer idea. I do have the convenience of quick charging my cart with the golf cart charger, because I am here all year long. My wife will be gone about a month in June/July so I will leave the maintainer on her cart. Her batteries are over five years old and still hanging in there. So far, I have a high opinion of the Save-a-battery charger/maintainer, especially with the great deal I got it for, $75.92 plus shipping.

This thread was supposed to be about the cheap desulfator that hooked up to my wife's old batteries. It is still hooked up and so far, nothing negative has occurred. My wife still swears that her cart operates with a little bit more spirit, but I doubt if there would be any noticeable change due to the desulfator at this early stage. I will check the plates in a couple of months to see if I can detect any visible desulfation. They are old batteries so this experiment can't hurt. Eventually, I will have to replace the batteries anyway.
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Unread 06-18-2015, 07:09 AM   #45
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Default Re: Old batteries with desulfator

A bit of an update. My wife went out of town for three weeks, yesterday to visit family. Before she left, she asked me to check her cart out. I wheeled it out of the garage and checked the batteries. Almost every one of them had water below the plates. But, on a good note, the plates are starting to look cleaner than before I installed the cheap desulfator on her cart. I filled the cells up with distilled water, just below the fill tube and gave it another charge. Then I put the Sav-a-battery maintainer on it overnight. The maintainer gave the charge a bit of a boost and is now in the maintenance mode. I will use her cart a bit while she is gone, and will charge it and keep the maintainer on it when not being used. Her batteries are already over five years old, but still seem to get her where she needs to go. I'm trying to see if I can stretch the lifespan out a bit, but also realize that if I don't keep up on maintaining the water level in the batteries, it won't make much difference in what I attach to them. I guess she is not going to check the batteries so I will have to set up a schedule. I don't use my Club car as much as she uses her Yamaha, so I am less inclined to check the batteries as often. Seems like my water level is always fine when I check mine, but then I don't charge mine every day as she does. I guess I will put one of those cheap desulfators on my batteries, since I originally purchased two of them. I bought two of them because they were on sale for half price. Didn't really expect wonders from something so cheap, but I believe her batteries are starting to look much better. They still don't seem to charge as high as mine, but as soon as my digital meters get here and I get them installed, I should have a better idea how high both carts are charging and how long before the charge drops on it's own after initial charge.

Another difference in our carts is that I have an old series powered CC DS and she has a regen Yamaha.
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Unread 06-18-2015, 09:03 AM   #46
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Default Re: Old batteries with desulfator

I charge my Yamaha every day or two and I need to add water about once a month. The more often you charge (not how much you drive) the more often you will have to add water. If you have a weak battery, it can consume far more water than the rest of them.
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Unread 06-18-2015, 01:02 PM   #47
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Default Re: Old batteries with desulfator

Quote:
Originally Posted by Volt_Ampere View Post
I charge my Yamaha every day or two and I need to add water about once a month. The more often you charge (not how much you drive) the more often you will have to add water. If you have a weak battery, it can consume far more water than the rest of them.
What you say sounds logical to me. We always charge our carts, no matter how short or long distance we travel. Since the charging correlates with the frequency of cart usage, her cart gets charged daily. Mine, only a few times per week. Right now, I am using my cart more often than previously, so mine is also being charged frequently. So, since her cart is getting charged more often than mine, it stands to reason that her battery water level will descend quicker. I will eventually replace her batteries, but for now I am treating this as an unorthodox experiment. I want to see if I can rehabilitate her batteries to a certain extent, and I want to see how long I can keep them functioning. I only replaced mine because I had one bad battery and they were almost five years old. I believe I had a bad cell in one of my batteries. Since replacing them, I also replaced my old 16vdc voltage reducer to a 48vdc to 12vdc voltage reducer. Now I am using all the batteries and not just two of them.
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Unread 07-13-2015, 02:52 PM   #48
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Default Re: Old batteries with desulfator

Ok, a bit of an update:
My returned from out of town so I unhooked the Sav-a-battery maintainer from it. She drove the cart and said it felt a bit sluggish. Today, she took a friend to the pool and almost didn't make it. She said it "started jerking and then slowing to a crawl like it was going to stop." She stopped it for a moment and then slowly made it to her destination. On the way back, it happened again and she stopped it and then slowly came home. I checked the batteries with a volt meter and found that all but one were way over 8 volts, with the one at 6+. It's an analogue meter so I didn't get a good reading. I figure that the one batter probably has a bad cell. I still took off the cables, cleaned them and then decided to replace them with my old battery cables which were practically new before I changed them for thicker gauge cables. I cleaned all the posts and any extraneous connections and reconnected all the wiring. The first battery, the one that seemed bad, had battery acid build up around the wiring, hardly noticeable until you took the cables off. I removed the cheapo, Chinese desulfator from the cart for the time being. The other batteries seemed to have a very good charge on them, so I wonder if the desulfator really DID work or if it's merely a placebo. Once the battery charger finishes, I plan to check the individual cells for proper gravity to see if I am right about only the one battery being bad. Since I still want to experiment with the desulfator, I am hoping to find a decent used battery to replace the bad one so that I can continue to see if the desulfator is going to prolong the battery pack lifespan. I am checking the neighborhood to see if anyone is preparing to purchase a new battery pack for their golf cart so that maybe I can swap one of their batteries for my bad one before they change theirs out.
Note: The condition of my wife's batteries is entirely my fault. I should have cleaned the cables when I installed the desulfator.
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Unread 07-15-2015, 07:16 AM   #49
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Default Re: Old batteries with desulfator

Ok, so after charging the pack up, I found that all the batteries but one showed 8.49 to 8.51 volts. The one at the beginning of the pack showed 6+ volts. I wonder if that cheapo desulfator contributed to problem with the first battery in the pack? Examination of the battery cells DID show that sulfation was very low. The plates do appear to be pretty clean. I decided to go ahead (against all advice) and purchase a new Trojan T-875 battery for $115. I installed the new battery and charged the whole pack. Then I drove it about 8 - 10 miles to see if I had properly diagnosed the power issue that my wife complained of. I had no problems with the cart during the travel. I decided to leave the desulfator off the battery pack for now. Was it coincidence that the first battery in the pack, the one with the desulfator connected to it, went bad? I really need to know a bit more about desulfators. I understand that they use surges of electricity to work, but if they are hooked to several batteries in a row, I wonder if they all get treated equally or would the surge be weaker at the end of the pack and stronger at the first of the pack. And then, I have also read that they work on some sonic principle. I wonder how much of it is smoke and mirrors and how much of it is truth.
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Unread 07-17-2015, 09:39 AM   #50
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Default Re: Old batteries with desulfator

Yesterday, I drove the cart about 8 miles and then put the charger on it. It charged up in the evening. This morning, I backed the cart out of the garage for my wife and put the digital meter on it to see how much charge I had after sitting over night. 50.9 volts. According to the battery chart, that's 100% charge. I also realize that all but one of the batteries are over five years old. They do appear to be in good shape, even though they have been abused. The plates look pretty clean, so I am not sure if it is a result of the cheapo Chinese desulfator, or the fact that my wife uses it almost daily and slaps the charger on it when she returns home. When another battery goes bad, I will replace the remaining five in the pack.
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