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Unread 05-16-2016, 08:48 AM   #1
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Default how to test a motor

when I got my carts I found a 48 volt series motor in a regen 2 cart and I am sure that is what killed the controller. The regen motor came in a box watched to a rear end with the bolts removed. it was called "left over" parts. I am not sure if the rear end went bad or the motor because the regen was stuck to the rear end. anyway can you just hook up voltage to F1 and A1 and get the motor to turn and then to F2 and A2?
can I ohm the motor out? What5 is the correct way to test a motor?
Maybe I can save some money and not buy a new motor right now while I am putting this together. I see it has the speed sensor pulled out and it is hanging on the wire harness in the cart can this be fixed if the motor still turns or checks out?
Thanks
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Unread 05-16-2016, 02:08 PM   #2
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Default Re: how to test a motor

I found this info!

First off, for series motors, you need to wire the field in series with the armature. Usually like A1 to B+, A2 to S1, & S2 to B-. Then careful to use a low voltage for B+ and B-. 12 Volts max.

You have a SepEx motor. So don't connect it up like a series motor. And all SepEx motors are not the same as far as field strength and resistance. But if you are careful and watch it, like be there if things start to get hot and smell ripe, you can test it with a single 12 volt battery. I have some nice power supplies available, so use those, one supply on the armature and one on the field and can adjust them separately. If you have this available, do it. Adjust the field to about 6 to 8 amps and bring the armature voltage up slowly. Watch RPM and raise the armature voltage such that you see about 2000 RPM. You can then adjust the field voltage while leaving the armature voltage alone. And you can see the effects of field weakening. But keep an eye on the RPM and keep it under 4000, to be safe. The lower the field current, the higher the RPM. And you may find that you trip the armature power supply if you increase the field current too fast because it regenerates into the power supply.

So, you probably don't have 2 power supplies. Just use a 12 volt battery. Hook the field up first and disconnect the field last. Remember this. O.K. So connect F1 to B+ and F2 to B-. You'll see a little spark. Endure it. It won't hurt. Use like #16 wire for the field to battery. Should be at most 10 to 12 amps. If the wires get hot, better shut down.

Now you have the field excited. You can use the same battery for the armature or a different one. You probably want a little heavier wire, like jumper cables. Connect A1 to B+ and A2 to B-. Again you'll get a spark. And the motor will rotate. It will accelerate quickly and tend to rotate on the bench. You should have nothing connected to the shaft, maybe those pulleys are o.k. You can strap it down or block it so it does fall off onto your foot.

So now you have 12V to the field and 12V to the armature. Should be rotating smoothly, maybe 700 to 1000 RPM. Should be no big sparks anywhere, or smoke, or bad smells. If so, shunt down, ARMATURE FIRST, then the field. If you disconnect the field first, you might get a speed up of the armature and then a real high current in the armature and could damage stuff. Same on start up. FIELD FIRST, then connect the armature.

Now, I cannot tell what that field is rated for. So 12 volts to a 1 ohm field will be 12 amps. That might be over the field coils' rated current. So don't run it there for hours. Maybe 20 minutes if you watch it.

With an empty output shaft, you're running at no-load. So the armature current will be low, but higher than the field. Maybe 30 to 50 amps. So it will draw down the battery pretty fast. At no-load current, the armature and brushes should not overheat for hours. So you can run the motor for a while and break it in. You can even hook up a battery charger to the battery and use it to run longer, or run the battery down, charge overnight and run it again tomorrow.

If you have a separate battery on the field, make sure it does not run down while you have the armature excited. It will speed up. I doubt it will overspeed with 12 volts on the armature, but it will draw excessive current and can damage the comm and brushes. Without field current, the armature is basically a short circuit across the battery.

There you go, but don't blame me if things go wrong Just kidding. But do be safe. 12 volts is not going to electrocute anybody, but it can draw a big arc which will melt a wrench and send a molten spitball into your eye. So wear safety glasses. Use your head (and brain) and good luck.
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Unread 05-16-2016, 03:23 PM   #3
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Default Re: how to test a motor

DO NOT run these motors when they are not connected to a rear end! You will ruin it because the armature is not supported in the front when it is not installed. It will rub on the field pieces and tear itself up. The front bearing is part of the rear end.
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Unread 05-16-2016, 05:18 PM   #4
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Default Re: how to test a motor

I ran them on the rear ends! the series one ran nice and smooth which I figured it would.
The regen 2 motor which I had a feeling was bad is acting bad. at 12 volts it clicks and hops a little and sometimes moves. I hooked up 12 volts on the F terminals and then 16 on the A terminals and it turns but it is jerky. the battery cables will smoke a little also.
I am guessing that motor is bad? I was really hoping this motor was good that is the one I needed to be good!
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Unread 05-16-2016, 05:25 PM   #5
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Default Re: how to test a motor

Disassemble it and take a look at the armature and brushes. Sounds like they need work.
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Unread 05-16-2016, 06:37 PM   #6
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Default Re: how to test a motor

What kind of work are we talking I am up to it! Is it possible to get a new speed sensor?
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Unread 05-16-2016, 07:12 PM   #7
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Default Re: how to test a motor

That is not your problem if the motor did not run well on a battery only. (Yes you can replace the speed sensor if necessary though)
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Unread 05-16-2016, 07:33 PM   #8
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Default Re: how to test a motor

Yes I kind of figured it wasn't the speed sensor it was an un-related question. I found the speed sensor now just not the cover for it. I will show a pic and the pic of the motor.
I did find the front bearing is getting bad when you turn it you can feel each ball rotate.
here are the pics let me know if I can clean this up or if it is toast. I know the easy route is to replace it but it is fun to fix it!
Thanks
Attached Images
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Unread 05-16-2016, 07:53 PM   #9
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Default Re: how to test a motor

To test run a Sep-Ex (regen) motor. The motor needs to be bolted to the rear end, NOT unbolted and sitting on the work bench

Remove all cables from the motor; connect a jumper from A1 to F1 and a jumper from A2 to F2. Connect 12 to 24 volts, positive @ A1/F1 and negative @ A2/F2. Swap F1 and F2 to change rotation direction.

NOTE: some Sep-Ex motors are labeled S1 & S2 in place of F1 & F2

CAUTION:

Allowing a motor to spin @ high RPM can cause catastrophic failure!. Only do this test with the motor bolted to the rear end

Put vehicle in TOW mode before attempting testing process if vehicle has TOW switch . . .
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Unread 05-17-2016, 09:32 AM   #10
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Default Re: how to test a motor

From the pix I would say that motor can be cleaned up. It looks like water got in there at some point based on the rust. Replace the bearing for sure. Clean up the commuatator with some fine emery paper and clean the slots between the copper bars.
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