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Unread 04-15-2009, 07:57 PM   #11
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Default Re: Charging Problem

Actually the old charger was bad. I did buy the new batteries too, but now I can get the new charger to come on but can't get it to move.
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Unread 04-16-2009, 10:28 AM   #12
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Default Re: Charging Problem

For 48 Volt Cart with OBC and A Automatic PowerDrive charger
the charger should come on and charge up to but not exceeding 16 Hours when the Pack Voltage is Greater than 36 Volts !
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Unread 04-16-2009, 11:19 AM   #13
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Default Re: Charging Problem

Quote:
Originally Posted by scottyb View Post
This is way too much amperage for a 12v charger on an 8 volt battery for this long
I agree with you to a point. You do need to keep an eye on them and make sure they are topped up. For some, electrically challenged, maybe this is not the best advice.

Most equalizer cycles on a high end charger will charge at 50% over rated battery voltage for about an hour which de-sulfates (boils) the battery and in turn giving them somewhat new life. 20 amps for an hour is not that bad, try it on an old 8v battery sometime and you will see what I mean. It may even bring a bad battery back to a serviceable condition.

The 8x6v GC's (series/parallel) I have on my boat, have a 130 amp charger and when put into the equalizer state are subjected to 18v on a 12v system for an hour. Yes, they get warm, yes, they boil and yes, they have been there since 2002 and still give great performance without a hint of failure. Hard to tell if I will get 10 years out of these but time will tell.
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Unread 04-16-2009, 11:29 AM   #14
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Default Re: Charging Problem

On the Trojan web site they describe the act of de-sulfating Batteries.
I agree with both statments and think it is a matter of
Experience, Confidence and COMMON scense what one tries of does not try !
COMMON scense being the most critical attribute here !
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Unread 04-16-2009, 11:36 AM   #15
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Default Re: Charging Problem

Good info...the problem is some people think that if an hour is good? Then, 2 hours is better.....
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Unread 04-16-2009, 11:52 AM   #16
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Default Re: Charging Problem

News Flash. I went back and re-read my info and it appears scottyb's statement has validity. Limiting the charger to 10 amps seems more appropriate. Thanks scottyb for pointing this out.
Here is a quote on the equalization process from my manual:
Quote:
THE EQUALIZING PROCESS
An equalizing charge is a controlled overcharge cycle that performs several actions within the
battery and provides certain benefits. During equalization, the voltage is raised to approximately
2.7 volts per cell, or about 16.2 volts for a 12-volt battery. The current output of the charger
should be limited to about 5% of the battery's capacity. In other words, a 200-amp hour battery
should be allowed to accept no more than about 10 amps of current. This will help prevent
overheating. The equalize cycle is timed to be between 4 and 8 hours depending on the features
of the charging source, but the cycle can always be terminated early if necessary. The particular
battery manufacturer's recommendations for equalization time should be followed.
This elevated voltage results in a vigorous charging action to take place within each cell that has
several effects on the battery. First, much of the residual sulfate is forced to re-combine with the
electrolyte in the form of sulfuric acid. Crystallized sulfate that will not re-combine is broken loose
from the plates and falls harmlessly to the bottom of the battery. Deep cycle batteries have
additional space beneath the plates intended to collect this material. This action cleans the plates
exposing fresh lead to the electrolyte and restores battery capacity.
The vigorous bubbling action that occurs during equalization stirs up the electrolyte and restores
it to a consistent mixture of acid and water. The equalizing process also causes all cells in a
battery to reach their maximum idle potential of 2.1 volts.
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